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My favorite games are either gloomy atmospheric Symbolist shadow-dungeons or toyetic cel-shaded Japanese child-adventures.
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Too tired to write a review so here are the stray components: A clumsily-written story, unrelated to the themes of the series, which clearly only serves to set up the characters and setting for a sequel (or trilogy); a combat system that feels unsatisfying and restrictive in its insistence on being constantly cinematic; enemies that are little more than damage sponges when they're supposed to be tougher; the same tired "fatherhood-as-escort-mission" framework that AAA games throw out as a sign that they've "grown up"; unnecessary gestures towards non-linearity and crafting which feel half-assed, redundant and checklist-y; insultingly straightforward puzzles which only serve to break up the action for the sake of maintaing a tedious, movie-game pacing; shameless use of every modern-AAA-game trick in the book (shimmying-as-loading, playable cutscenes, "event" boss fights, etc); beautiful, Technicolor eighties-fantasy environments.

Everything about this game's presentation—the moody pre-rendered backgrounds, the Celtic folk-synth score, the monstrous creature designs, the surprisingly decent voice acting—is amazing. It's all weighed down by an excrutiatingly slow combat system that not even the game's brief campaign can justify.

A pretty hare-brained survival thriller with broad political themes, what sets Aconcagua apart (aside from its setting) is its Resident Evil/MGS-esque approach to point-n-click adventuring, with puzzle solutions that have to make sense to the characters, and not just to you, the player.