Super Mario Bros.

Super Mario Bros.

released on Sep 13, 1985

Super Mario Bros.

released on Sep 13, 1985

A side scrolling 2D platformer and first entry in the Super Mario franchise, Super Mario Bros. follows Italian plumber Mario as he treks across many levels of platforming challenges featuring hostile enemies to rescue Princess Peach from the evil king Bowser.


Also in series

Mario Bros.
Mario Bros.
Mario Clash
Mario Clash
Punch Ball Mario Bros.
Punch Ball Mario Bros.
Mario Bros. Special
Mario Bros. Special
Mario Bros.
Mario Bros.

Released on

Genres


More Info on IGDB


Reviews View More

Have you guys ever heard of this game? It’s pretty good!

It’s a classic but compared to now there’s no reason to go back

je connais même pas la plupart des stages j'ai pris la warp comme un golmon

Monolithic though it may be, the original NES version of Super Mario Bros. simply didn't age very well. The physics feel wonky and inconsistent, and a great deal of the game's length is buffered by difficulty rather by actual content. It's hard to feel accomplished upon beating a tough level or world when you know you'll just have to come back and beat it again if you run out of lives. I appreciate the placement of warp pipes to alleviate this issue, but saving your progress should be a game feature, not a hidden secret or easter egg.

However, I did have fun playing this game. It's easy to see how this game "jump"-started (haha) the platforming genre, as many ideas pioneered in this game became staples of the franchise as a whole. The game may seem bare-bones in hindsight, with a relatively small variety of power-ups, enemies, and levels, but the content that IS there is surprisingly polished for such an old game. The enemies become predictable and consistent once you understand how they work, and there's a ton of different twists that make each level unique, such as underwater segments, moving platform challenges, and, of course, the dreaded hammer bro gauntlets. This is an incredibly satisfying game to master and beat.

Regardless, there's just too much missing here to ever justify playing the original over the SNES All-Stars remake, which fixes a lot of the game's problems, making movement feel more consistent, saving your game at the start of each world, and looking/sounding better overall. In contrast, the punishing game-over system makes the original version of the game feel more suitable to an arcade machine than a home console. I feel some guilt judging this game so harshly just because the mechanics it introduced became so much more polished over the years, but for a guy born in the 2000s, there's not much reason to go back and play this game if I'm craving some Mario. Unless you're craving a particularly challenging experience, everything this game does is done better in future installments.

Un pequeño replay con el Switch online por los jajas que he hecho en ratitos sueltos desde el sábado hasta hoy

Como plataformas rapidito está y sigue genial pero aún me supera como era la dificultad en los 80: 7-4 y 8-4 son niveles que me he podido pasar sin guía pero tras unos buenos minutos de ensayo y error (la mecánica de pasar por los pasillos correctos ha envejecido fatal)

Me ha sorprendido mucho cosas que había olvidado como que solo hay dos niveles acuáticos en todo el juego o ciertos enemigos introducidos gradualmente (no hay poodoboos en el 1-4 pero sí en el 2-4)

Es Super Mario Bros. Es icónico.

Foundational work and all that, but I can't help but feel that the physics are pretty rigid and some of the later levels were rather frustrating.

The music is iconic and beautiful and all that, but I do feel like the game evokes a sense of artificial difficulty brought on by tricky jumps, wonky physics, and puzzle-esque trial and error segments. Topped off with the outdated life system and you've got a game that you either practice enough to be a master in some sense or you use save states.