Bio
I only played wow from 2016 to 2022 and and then I realized that other games existed
Personal Ratings
1★
5★

Badges


Full-Time

Journaled games once a day for a month straight

On Schedule

Journaled games once a day for a week straight

Well Written

Gained 10+ likes on a single review

Best Friends

Become mutual friends with at least 3 others

Gone Gold

Received 5+ likes on a review while featured on the front page

Noticed

Gained 3+ followers

Liked

Gained 10+ total review likes

Favorite Games

Dark Souls
Dark Souls
Hollow Knight
Hollow Knight
World of Warcraft Classic
World of Warcraft Classic
Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 2
Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 2
TrackMania Nations Forever
TrackMania Nations Forever

054

Total Games Played

036

Played in 2024

001

Games Backloggd


Recently Played See More

TrackMania Nations Forever
TrackMania Nations Forever

Apr 23

The Witness
The Witness

Apr 19

ChuChu Rocket!
ChuChu Rocket!

Apr 19

Kero Blaster
Kero Blaster

Apr 18

Super Mario World
Super Mario World

Apr 16

Recently Reviewed See More

I've decided that from now on, I'm going to hook the reader with a clickbait title. Here's my title:

if you enjoyed Celeste, you might loveTrackmania Nations Forever.

Disclaimers: I'm not a fan of cars in real life. 2. I'm not a fan (at first glance) of simulation games. Luckily, Trackmania Nations Forever isn't a game for car enthusiasts or simulation fans. I'd go even further: it's not really a traditional racing game. You don't navigate the 65 tracks to beat opponents but to beat a time. The whole appeal of the game lies in this singular goal: a certain idea of perfectionism.

Everything surrounding this goal is far from perfect: TMNF's graphics are generally quite generic despite some nice lighting effects. The music is a kind of dull lounge house. There's no damage physics, all cars have the same characteristics. All tracks seem to have been made with the same level editor.

What makes TMNF a great game is the driving mechanics. The simplistic controls (accelerate, turn left, right, and sometimes brake) demand great precision. It's all about perfect timing. Revelation for me: I realize that racing games are mostly 3D games but with 2D game controls. Like a platformer, inputs could be articulated on a simple X-axis (left and right) and Y-axis (accelerate, brake). I'd struggle to say why this particular game has such exceptional control, but it's a feeling I've never had in any racing game before. It's both immediately easy to grasp but exponentially difficult to master.

You do need a certain mindset to get into this game: having the 'grind' culture. Being a bit obstinate to restart the same course dozens or even hundreds of times to get the medal you want (for me, I stopped at the gold medal). A bit like Celeste, we work on micro-segments (the average duration of a race is about 45 sec.) that we must master. Another totally unique element of this game is the ability to 'brake in the air' and decide on your trajectory (like a 2D platformer). It's physically totally improbable but very interesting in terms of gameplay.

There's obviously a highly competitive aspect and a ranking system on two scales: a local one (a bronze to Nadeo medal system (higher than Gold)) and a quite laughable global leaderboard system. It's always fun to be proud of one of these courses before realizing that you're just entering the top 100,000 worldwide. The somewhat comical patriotic or regional aspect, I'm quite proud to be in the top 100 of a part of Switzerland (which is not already a big country).

Anyway, play it, it's free

Similar to Fantavision (a fireworks game released on the day of the PS2 launch), Chuchurocket is somewhat of an oddity: a puzzle game with very simple graphics that doesn't fully utilize the power of the new console.

Although I'm usually a fan of this genre of puzzle games, I find that Chuchu Rocket lacks depth in its gameplay, which seems to be identical from level 1 to 100. Regardless of the level, the mice move in straight lines, turning right when they hit a wall. There are two types of dangers: cats and voids. It's a bit lacking in terms of variety.

The difficulty is also strangely managed: sometimes too easy, sometimes challenging, but too often completely random; the levels progress with boredom. Nevertheless, I persisted in finishing this game because there's something fundamentally oddly satisfying about seeing these lines of little mice narrowly avoiding enemies

Hard to really recommend it


Successor (or not) to Cave Story, Kero Blaster goes against what one might expect from a sequel: the storytelling simplifies, transitioning from a semi-open metroidvania format to a linear game, and the lifespan is half as short. Yet, this shift isn't truly a subtraction but a refinement. Kero Blaster is much more enjoyable to play than Cave Story: the physics, the gameplay, the progression, the enemies, the weapons, etc... all come together in an organic and thoughtful manner. Instead of indulging in the grandiosity of levels and storytelling, it seems Daisuke Amaya worked on his game like a miniature.

Many somewhat pompous terms from me for a game that's essentially fun from start to finish. I'm really a fan of the difficulty progression: if you're stuck in a tough passage, you keep accumulating gold coins which grant access to extra lives and other upgrades. Even in defeat, you make progress.

A great "small" game to absolutely experience.