Bio
A guy whompt play game.
:)
Personal Ratings
1★
5★

Badges


N00b

Played 100+ games

Favorite Games

Mirror's Edge
Mirror's Edge
The Witness
The Witness
Bomb Rush Cyberfunk
Bomb Rush Cyberfunk
Half-Life 2
Half-Life 2
Ultrakill
Ultrakill

143

Total Games Played

000

Played in 2024

035

Games Backloggd


Recently Reviewed See More

Takes the puzzle elements of survival horror to their farthest conclusion by making the whole game an intricate little puzzle box, visuals and all. Steep that all in lovingly crafted atmosphere, and Crow Country is an easy recommend.

While my main complaint is that the loot and enemies are both a bit too forgiving (the only time I died my whole first playthrough was in the Mush Room), it was likely on purpose; While I didn't find the game very scary, it understands the strange horror/cozy fugue state of the classic Resi's and Silent Hills to a fine point, just with the scale tipped the other way. I hope more indie games can capture that mentality in the future.

It's always special playing a new game and realizing you're witnessing a big shift in the indie scene yet to take place. I don't mean asset flippy knock offs (though we'll get plenty of those), I mean the seamless blend between off the cuff story-generating and the sheer dumb fun of chaotic coop multiplayer.

Lethal Company pulls from the same well Left 4 Dead did with its AI director, yet builds on it by, ironically, tearing off the intricately crafted training wheels and not being afraid to let the player crash and burn by no fault of their own. While safety nets stave off frustration, Lethal Company shows that unchecked randomness, in the right environment, can craft memories that will stay with you far longer than any AAA set piece. (For more on that, check out Mosa Lina and its similarly kneecap busting RNG.) Every quota is sure to spit out at least one memorable player story, emboldened by the presence of coworkers to turn to and say "can you believe this shit?".

Another reason I think Lethal Company’s gameplay loop works so well is that every little detail interacts with another of the game’s systems in some way ensuring even more variety, almost in an immersive sim kinda way. A player diligently aware of the game’s systems will know to sneak silently around blind enemies, only to step on a whoopie cushion. How worth is salvaging a gold bar if it makes you the slowest person in the group? There’s so many variables to keep track of, interesting player stories are bound to happen whether you like it or not.

While I’m sure many game devs are taking notes as we speak, I don't think Lethal Company will easily be overwritten by its successors. Zeekerss' idiosyncratic style oozes personality from every janky alien orifice, finding unique comedy in everything from the art to the enemy designs to even the animation. The visuals are a great example of simple graphics allowing for a strong art style.

Make no mistake because of the game’s meme-status, Lethal Company is extremely solidly designed with fresh ideas executed well. Maybe it’s just wishful thinking, but I expect a trend of multiplayer sandbox-type games to follow, which makes me very excited for the near future.